Paul Gauguin Cruise: The Ship

Our photographers asked to do Islands Expeditions aboard Paul Gauguin because it's 1) casual; 2) small enough for personal instruction; 3) able to sail in shallow water. The result? We wake up in spots where the photo ops never end. Book Now

m/s Paul Gauguin
The Perfect Fit
We could spend a week on the m/s Paul Gauguin and never leave the ship. All cabins have ocean views. The deck spaces are unusually large. And there are only 332 guests, max. So yeah, we could stay on board. Except that the best part of this ship is where it's going to take us.Courtesy Paul Gauguin
m/s Paul Gauguin: Suites and Staterooms
Where You'll Sleep
This is not bunking. Even the word "cabin" is rightly replaced with "stateroom" throughout the ship. Each one is 200 to 534 square feet (including verandas). More than 70 percent of the rooms have private balconies, and all have queen-size beds, tubs and stocked fridges.Courtesy Paul Gauguin
m/s Paul Gauguin: Dining
Dining in a Postcard
Spectacular views are always right there from the three restaurants. Our photographers like to mix it up, so while they might prefer the outdoor eating at Le Grill, at some point you'll catch them shooting food near the floor-to-ceiling windows at La Veranda.Courtesy Paul Gauguin
m/s Paul Gauguin: Dining
The Meals
Fresh seafood. Polynesian dishes. A bottle of wine. We have no idea exactly what will be served on our Expedition, but we do know from previous experience, it will be amazing — and part of the package price. (Special dietary needs will be taken care of.)Courtesy Paul Gauguin
m/s Paul Gauguin: Pool and water activities
Water Activities
This is more than a photo workshop. It's also a cruise vacation. Swim or get scuba-certified in the pool. Sip an island-inspired cocktail from the pool bar. Watch the retractable water-sports marina appear with paddle boards, kayaks and other toys. Do what you want.Courtesy Paul Gauguin
v_10-04-bpg-0920.jpg
The m/s Paul Gauguin
The m/s Paul GauguinCourtesy Paul Gauguin